Replace broken

Nelson’s water main will take months to fix

The city council said the main water pipeline of the Maitai River will take until the end of the year to be repaired.

Provided

The city council said the main water pipeline of the Maitai River will take until the end of the year to be repaired.

Nelson’s main pipeline will take months to repair, according to Nelson City Council.

A 12 m hole in the pipe was discovered 1.3 km downstream of the dam.

Alec Louverdis, director of NCC’s infrastructure group, said the council aimed to have the Maitai raw water pipeline repaired by the end of the year.

The pipeline is Nelson’s primary means of delivering ‘raw’ or untreated water to the city, and was damaged in recent flooding.

READ MORE:
*Protection of spring water is the focus of new council regulations
* Essential services continue as Nelson-Tasman mayors ask residents to adhere to Covid-19 lockdown guidelines
* Burst water main cuts off water for Washington Valley in Nelson

Nelson residents were initially asked to conserve water, but that request has since been waived.

Louverdis said the pipeline rupture occurred about 1.3 km west of the Maitai Dam. The pipeline roughly follows the path of the Maitai River.

Alec Louverdis, director of the NCC's infrastructure group, said a landslide caused the pipeline to rupture.

Nelson City Council

Alec Louverdis, director of the NCC’s infrastructure group, said a landslide caused the pipeline to rupture.

Louverdis said a “significant” landslide had occurred in the area through which the pipeline passes.

Louverdis said the pipeline would be “a major repair” and the area was difficult to access. A Geotech engineer had already visited the site.

“We are currently developing a plan on how to get the required materials to site and establishing what work needs to be done to ensure the replacement section of pipe can be supported.”

Louverdis said Nelson’s secondary water supply, also known as the Duplicate Raw Water Pipeline, was working well and working as expected.

Previously, the city’s water supply had been at reduced capacity, with reports of discolored water in Tāhunanui and Stoke.